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Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/336559
Description: Aquaculture has long been seen as a sustainable solution to some of the world's growing food shortages. However, experience over the past 50 years indicates that infectious diseases caused by viruses, ... More
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Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/165848
Description: Pinctada fucata Gould 1850 was first commercially cultivated in Japan in the early 1920s. Japan dominated this market until the proliferation of Akoya viral disease (AVD) in 1996. Since that time the ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2008
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1143441
Description: The colonies of ants, bees, wasps and termites, the social insects, consist of large numbers of closely related individuals; circumstances ideal for contagious diseases. Antimicrobial assays of these ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2008
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1144891
Description: Ectoparasites were collected from 32 wild spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus) trapped in the Tuggolo State Forest, New South Wales, Australia, during February and March 2005. Species collected ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2007
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1142117
Description: Evidence for the antiquity and importance of microbial pathogens as selective agents is found in the proliferation of antimicrobial defences throughout the animal kingdom. Social insects, typified by ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2001
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1139146
Description: The environment in which we live greatly influences our health. One particular factor that has been related to morbidity and mortality is dwelling crowding. A range of mechanisms have been proposed as ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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