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Date: 2016
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1071850
Description: People who experience auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) vary in whether they believe their AVHs are self-generated or caused by external agents. It remains unclear whether these differences are in ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2016
Subject Keyword: ERPs | N1 | MMN | Auditory attention | Meditation
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1189615
Description: The findings of a study by Cahn and Polich (2009) suggests that there is an effect of a meditative state on three event-related potential (ERP) brain markers of "low-level" auditory attention (i.e., a ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2016
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1205070
Description: Prodigies of music composition exhibit a range of cognitive skills that differentiate them from other prodigies. However, there is little understanding of the nature of these skills, how they are acqu ... More
Date: 2016
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1223011
Description: Hypnosis and meditation both involve private, subjective experiences. As a result, they can be difficult to investigate in empirical studies. This chapter discusses some of the theoretical and methodo ... More
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/342243
Description: Over the past decades, delusions have become the subject of growing and productive research spanning clinical and cognitive neurosciences. Despite this, the nature of belief, which underpins the const ... More
Full Text: Full Text
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/359011
Description: Hypnosis can create temporary, but highly compelling alterations in belief. As such, it can be used to model many aspects of clinical delusions in the laboratory. This approach allows researchers to r ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1064171
Description: Hypnotic suggestions can be used to model the symptoms of clinical disorders. In recent work, we applied this approach to study mirrored-self misidentification delusion, the belief that one’s reflecti ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/358908
Description: 19 page(s)
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/359001
Description: 4 page(s)
Full Text: Full Text
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1044354
Description: 14 page(s)
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/340848
Description: 3 page(s)
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/336441
Description: Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one’s reflection in the mirror is a stranger. According to an influential theory, the content of this delusion can arise from either impai ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/306943
Description: 2 page(s)
Full Text: Full Text
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/302239
Description: There is compelling evidence that hypnotic suggestions can be used to model clinical delusions in the laboratory. In two studies, we investigated the role that personality factors, delusion proneness ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2014
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/304786
Description: IntroductionPatients with delusions typically seek less information when making decisions than controls ("jumping-to-conclusions, JTC) and paradoxically over-adjust to counter-evidence on probabilisti ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed