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Date: 2012
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/174445
Description: Reply to Stevenson, R. J. (2011). Olfactory illusions: Where are they? Consciousness and Cognition, 21, 1887–1898.
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/130142
Description: Historically, anatomical evidence has suggested that marine mammals are anosmic or at best microsmatic, i.e. absent or reduced olfactory capabilities. However, these neuroanatomical considerations may... More
Reviewed:Reviewed
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/315944
Description: This paper explores how the quality of an odor changes as its concentration is increased. In Experiment 1, participants rated degree of presence for various qualities and stimulus intensity, for seven... More
Date: 2011
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/136802
Description: Olfaction has a unique dual-route pathway to the neocortex - one being via the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MDNT). In this study we explored the role of the MDNT pathway, by comparing six pati... More
Reviewed:Reviewed
Date: 2010
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/120041
Description: Although referred to in passing in several places, there have been few attempts to specify the functions of the human olfactory system. This article presents an initial effort at identifying and categ... More
Reviewed:Reviewed
Date: 2008
Language: eng
Resource Type: book chapter
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/48111
Description: Olfaction is not what you think. Although most of us know that we need eyes to see and ears to hear, most of us do not know that we need a nose to “taste,” yet olfaction is central to our enjoyment of... More
Date: 2005
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/289910
Description: Drinking wine is a manifestly sensuous experience. Wine stimulates most of our senses; particularly smell (olfaction) and taste, and, to a lesser extent, sight and touch. These sensory inputs interact... More
Reviewed:Reviewed
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