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Date: 2015
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/985816
Description: Both disgust and disease-related images appear able to induce an innate immune response but it is unclear whether these effects are independent or rely upon a common shared factor (e.g., disgust or di ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2010
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/116927
Description: Little is known about when or how different disgust elicitors are acquired. In Study 1, parents of children (0–18 years old) rated how their child would react to 22 disgust elicitors. Different develo ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/83110
Description: Many researchers have claimed that the emotion of disgust functions to protect us from disease. Although there have been several discussions of this hypothesis, none have yet reviewed the evidence in ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/82974
Description: Both disgust and contamination sensitivity likely evolved to protect us from infectious disease. Paradoxically, disgust may be reduced by frequent exposure to disgust-inducing cues — cues most likely ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/8267
Description: Disgust is a powerful behavioral adaptation, which confers the advantage of reducing the risk of pathogen infection. However, there are situations in which disgust at core elicitors (e.g., feces) must ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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