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Date: 2013
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/282009
Description: The Asian honey bee Apis cerana and the European honey bee Apis mellifera are closely related and morphologically very similar. Where these species coexist, they appear to compete, but the outcomes of ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2012
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/212713
Description: The biological concept of stress originated in mammals, where a “General Adaptation Syndrome” describes a set of common integrated physiological responses to diverse noxious agents. Physiological mech ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2010
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/93406
Description: How do flying insects monitor foraging efficiency? Honeybees (Apis mellifera) use optic flow information as an odometer to estimate distance travelled, but here we tested whether optic flow informs es ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2009
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1153004
Description: The role of cocaine as an addictive drug of abuse in human society is hard to reconcile with its ecological role as a natural insecticide and plant-protective compound, preventing herbivory of coca pl ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2007
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/41633
Description: Entomologists have used a range of techniques to treat insects with neuroactive compounds, but it is not always clear whether different treatment methods are equally effective in delivering a compound ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2007
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/40593
Description: Honey bees communicate the location and desirability of valuable forage sites to their nestmates through an elaborate, symbolic “dance language.” The dance language is a uniquely complex communication ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/29887
Description: The biogenic amine octopamine (OA) is involved in the regulation of honey bee behavioral development; brain levels are higher in foragers than bees working in the hive, especially in the antennal lobe ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/12029
Description: In plant-pollinator interactions, pollinating insects provide reproductive service to plants and receive food rewards. Flowers advertise the presence of nectar or pollen through various characteristic ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2006
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/29877
Description: There is now increasing evidence that honey bees regulate their ground speed in flight by holding constant the speed at which the image of the environment moves across the eye (optic flow). We have in ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2005
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/80582
Description: Australian crab spiders Thomisus spectabilis ambush pollinating insects, such as honeybees (Apis mellifera) on flowers, and can change their body colour between yellow and white. It is traditionally a ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2005
Language: eng
Resource Type: journal article
Identifier: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/80542
Description: Australian crab spiders Thomisus spectabilis sit on the petals of flowers and ambush prey such as honeybees. White-coloured T. spectabilis reflect in the UV (UV+ spiders) and previous research has sho ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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